about the tween book blog

This is the place to be for reviews of Children's and YA books! And, best of all, it is written by a 12 year old, who knows the perspective of tweens and teens!

Wednesday, 17 May 2017

Moonlocket

Moonlocket by Peter Bunzl

If you haven't already read the first in the series, you can find the review for Cogheart here

Lily and Robert are back with a new adventure! The noturious escape artist Jack Door has broken out of jail! On a visit to Roberts old house they find him staying there but he escapes. What they also find is a cresent moon locket with a map on the back. Will this lead Robert towards his mother, and what does Jack Door have to do with it?

Normally, the sequel to a great book is generally never quite as good. But Moonlocket was as good, maybe even better! I loved the adventure, the thrill and at times the terror. You never knew what was going to happen next. It was full of suprises. To be honest most of the best bits were the same as the last book. I loved the idea of mechanimals. I loved airships. I loved the focus on the Cogheart. And there was also new good things, such as the search for Roberts family (And family in general). I think my favourite character was Tolly, a street urchin. He was such a clever idea for a character. Someone who is unlickely to be of any assistance, yet becomes a main character by the end. Also, Tolly said some really insightful things. There was also a theme of independence. Lilys dad thinks that she is vunerable due to the Cogheart, and how people treat hybrids. But Lily actually goes against him, deciding to prove that she CAN do what she wants. I liked this theme, even if it is a common one in YA and childrens literature.

The one thing that I didn't like was the character of Finlo. He is Jack doors son. I didn't feel hat he was necessary, and I could do was feel sorry for him, even at the end. Also, when the climax was at its highest point, everything had just been revealed, and then there was a bit between Finlo and Jack that I thought was very unnecassary.

I am going to give it a 10/10
and and age rating of 10+

Image result for moon locket peter bunzl

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

TV or BOOKS

TV or BOOKS

In debating today, we had to speak on whether TV was more educational than books. Of course,a s a book blogger, I spoke on the side of the books, but it did make me wonder. So I thought I would write a blog post about it, if not only to solidify my own thoughts on the matter...



So first, the Pros and Cons of both sides:

Books

Books develop your language and your imagination.
When you start reading you start with a book with easy vocabulary, and gradually progress, where as when watching television, everything is dumbed down so that the channel can get as higher ratings as possible.

As for your imagination, when you are reading, you can imagine a character in any way you want, whereas whilst watching TV you are just sat there, not exercising your imagination at all.

However, and I am sure plenty of books bloggers will agree with me here, books are expensive. Not everyone has enough money to buy books, sadly. Also, with all those trees being cut down to create the paper, some might say that it is bad for the environment.

TV

Many people find it is easier to learn in a visual way, using things such as TV. With things such as documentaries, it has never been easier to learn from television.
Also, with TV, you don't need to learn how to do anything to do it (Unlike books where you have to learn to read.)

However, televisions are expensive, maybe even more so than books. Also, you need electricity to watch TV as well.



But I decided to ask twitter...

And, with a grand old total of ONE PERSON* voting by the time I wrote this post, I can safely say that 100% percent of twitter think that books are better...


But what do you think?
Are books better?
Or is TV more your cup of tea?

↓I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments↓


*Shoutout to whoever that was. You know who you are, even if I don't (Twitter is weird like that)




Saturday, 6 May 2017

Click on the titles of the reviews to buy the books. This is from the Close Your Eyes review onwards.

Dougal Daley, it's Not My Fault!

Dougal Daley, It's Not My Fault! by Jackie Marchant illustrated by Loretta Schauer

Dougal Daley is dead. Deader than dead. The deadest there is. This is beacuse:

A) The creature in his shed wants to eat him

B) His family and friends want to kill him and it's not his fault!! He hasn't done anything!!!



   Dougal Daley, It's Not My Fault is a funny younger childrens book. Whilst it is not what I would normally read, I was surprised to find myself really enjoying the humour of the book. My favourite parts were when Dougal was writing his will, I thought that it was funny that someone of that age was thinking so much about death. It was also funny that the title were things like "I, Dougal Daley, am even deader than before." The best bit about it was that half the time he wasn't even about to die, he was just scared of his parents. Dougal would keep writing notes to the police that if they ever found him killed in a certain way, then it would have been so and so (Normally his annoying older sister). On the subject of sister, there was always a funny brother and sister rivalry going on. Once or twice, it was her fault that he was in trouble. Dougal couldn't spell Sibble Sybil. Sybil, as well as everyone else, interjected into his writing, with notes that could sort of give you their perspective. I thought that it was brilliant that it was written from Dougal's perspective, as you mainly got his perspective when telling the story. This generally involved blaming someone else at the beginning. "Well, it was the hamster who started it really", or something like that.
   Now, onto the illustrations. These were brilliant, cartoonish pictures that were inserted into the book. Often, they might tell a story in there own, or add to the story. They reminded me of a mix between the Beano and Diary of a Wimpy Kid.
   Finally, onto someone elses opinion. One of my younger brothers is much closer to the age that the book is meant for. whilst he hasn't yet read the entire thing, as I was writing this review, he was reading out one of the pages nearer the start in fits of laughter.

I am going to give it an 8/10
And an age rating of 7+
Displaying jackiepic.jpg
Jackie Marchant, The Author

Displaying lorettapic.jpg
Loretta Schauer, The Illustrator
Displaying Dougal Daley.jpg
The Book itself!

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Close Your Eyes

Close Your Eyes by Nicci Cloke

Close Your Eyes is about a school shooting which we discover through a series of different formats, all leading us to the discovery of who was the behind it.

So, let's start with what genre it was. I would say a YA mystery, but that is debatable as the whole point of a mystery is that everyone finds out who done it at the end of the book. In Close Your Eyes, you were the only person that had no idea what was going on. I'd never encountered a book like it, all the other mystery books i have read, NO ONE knows who did it until the end. It was also a thriller, I mean it was about a school shooting! Onto the format. As previously hinted at, it was told in many different ways, the two most common of which were sections of interviews, as well as more traditional storytelling. Other formats included facebook and whatsapp messaging and excerpts from a private blog. It was a super interesting writing style, as you got to see inside the main characters' minds. In the interviews, you could really feel the different personalities of the characters, things like Gemma, one of the main characters, calling the interviewer babe. Still on the interviews, you never actually read what the interviewer had asked, yet from the way that Nicci Cloke wrote it, you still knew what it was, even if the question wasn't that obvious. Sometimes, the interviewee's would say something that had already been mentioned by someone else, or in the story part of it. This gave you a sense that they were backing up what had already been said, making it more realistic! To be honest, I couldn't think of anything that bad to say about it, except that it was quite sad and gruesome, as if the writing had a grey cloud hung over it. However, this might have been on purpose!

I am going to give it a 9/10
and an age rating of 14+

I Dare You Book Tag

So, to start with I would like to say thank you to Megan at Probability Reading for nominating me for my FIRST EVER TAG (I am insanely proud!)

The rules are that:
  • You must be honest
  • You can't not answer a question
  • You have to tag at least four people

Here we go...

Which book has been on your shelves the longest?

The oldest book is one of my Grandpa's Asimov's, although that it a fairly new addition to my own collection. I would say that the one thats been their the longest is a copy of James and the Giant peach by Roald Dahl.

Image result for James and the giant peach

What is your current read, your last read and the book you'll read next?

My last read was Close Your Eyes by Nicci Cloke, my current read is the Cardturner by Louis Sachar, and who knows what my next read will be. Probably something that I pick up in the school library.

Image result for The Cardturner

What book(s) did everyone like that you hated?

I actually wrote a post about this one. The book in question was The Catcher in the Rye by J.D.Salinger.


Image result for no to the catcher in the rye

Which book do you keep telling yourself you'll read, but probably won't?

Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome. I just can't bring myself to do it.


Image result for swallows and amazons

Which books are you saving for "retirement"?

I have absolutely no idea, and I generally don't know what I am going to read next, unless I have been given a recommendation.

Last Page: Read it first or wait till the end?

No, just no. It spoils the entire thing!

Acknowledgments: waste of ink and paper or interesting side?

I don't think that it is a waste of ink and paper, those people deserve to be thanked, yet I don't always read it as it generally isn't the most interesting part of the book.

Which book character would you switch places with?

Probably Charlie Bucket from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He has a grim beginning but life is pretty good by the end. Or maybe Alton from The Cardturner. I don't think that life was too hard for him.

Image result for charlie and the chocolate factory book

Do you have a book that reminds you of something specific in life?

Not that I can remember I don't. Any book where the main character has a love of reading and/or coding.

Name a book that you acquired in some interesting way.

 Probably the most interesting are all the books that I won with Book Bingo in my primary school. I can't remember any specifically, but I think that it is a cool way to get books.

Have you ever given away a book for a special reason to a special person?

I can't say that I've really given books away, but I do sometimes lend them to relatives.

Which book has been with you the most places?

I think that it is probably Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. That was the first book I got on my kindle, and I bring that with me on most holidays.

Image result for enders game

Any "Required reading" you hated in high school that wasn't too bad two years later?

When I first read Shakespeare with school, I didn't really like it, and was annoyed that we had to do a Shakespeare play as our school play, after spending a term studying him and his plays. But now I don't think that it is too bad!

Image result for shakespeare

What's the strangest item you've ever found in a book?

Nothing really springs to mind...

Have you ever read a Dan Brown?

Nope!

Have you ever seen a movie that you liked better than the book?

The harry potter series was alright... But then so were the books, so I'm not really sure if that's a proper answer!

Image result for harry potter film v books


A book that NEVER should have been published?

I have a tendency of liking most of the books I read. And even if I don't like them, I don't passionately hate them. All books have a right to be published.

Have you ever read a book that makes you hungry, cookbooks bing included from this question?

Going back to Harry Potter, any of the feasts in the great hall make me feel really hungry!

Image result for feast in the great hall

Who is the person whose book advice you'll always take?

The librarians at my school. (More than one person but WHATEVER!)

I nominate:

Jess at Jess Hearts Books
Nina at Death, Books and Tea
Zoe at Zoe's Book Blog
Cait at Paper Fury

If anyone else wants to do it, feel free, and leave me a link to the post in the comments!

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor

Cassie is a black girl growing up in the early twentieth century in America. She is young, and doesn't understand why the White Children's school bus always splashes her on the way to school. Why they even have a school bus. And she doesn't understand the 'night men' and what they have been doing. Why are they all so mean to her, when God created them all equal? Cassie begins to find out, and as she does, so do we...

The first thing I liked about Roll of Thunder was that it is a non-fiction book hidden in a fiction book. Whilst the actual story is made up, you get to learn a bit about American history. This was interesting for me as I live in Britain, go to a British school, and so therefore I mostly learn about British history. Learning about something else was a change, especially in the form of an excellent fiction book. When i first saw Roll of Thunder, I thought it was going to be a bit boring. The cover didn't really fit in with what you would expect a book to have as its cover nowadays (Although this is just the cover of the version I read. A quick search on the internet proves that there are quite a few different versions). I am sad to admit that I do sometimes judge a book by its cover, and so therefore probably wouldn't have picked up Roll of Thunder if I hadn't heard it was such a good book. Now, onto the actual plot. It was a good story as a whole, with what felt like quite a few side stories (Like Forrest Gump, which I recently watched). Like so many of the books I seem to be reading recently, it was very hard hitting, with many sad and shocking parts. There was also a lot of bad language, mostly against black people. This only added to how realistic the book was in describing what life was like for black people in North America in the early 20th century. I thought it was good that it was told from Cassie's perspective, and not any of her siblings. If it had been told from anyone else's perspective, then there would be no story, as either the narrator would either know not enough, or too much, about the world around them.

I am going to give it an 8/10
And an age rating of 13+

Image result for Roll of thunder hear my cry covers

Saturday, 1 April 2017

Hi people,

This is just a very quick post to let you know that I probably won't be posting this week as I am on holiday. If any one knows how to schedule posts they would be helping to stop this from happening again by putting it in the comments.

See you in a week!

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Survivors

Survivors by David Long and Kerry Hyndman

A Non-Fiction book on survivors throughout history. From Shakelton's Expedition to two men who shared a sandwich at the bottom of the sea, some of the best stories of survivors you will have read yet.

ok, so lets start with the tales. They were written in such a way that it would interest people of all ages. It was interesting for my age, would have been interesting for older people and it was written is such a way that anyone younger than I am could still have understood it very easily, with the trickier parts explained, so that everyone could benefit from the awesome stories. i think that my favourite story was about the guy who had to operate on himself with no antibiotics. That was pretty hard hitting, but also an excellent short story.

Now, onto the illustrations. As the pictures will show, these were absolutely amazing. You would expect real life photos in a non-fiction book, but no, these were definitely drawn.  At the bottom of each page, there was a nice pattern, but that wasn't the best part. There were some absolutely AMAZING double page spreads, showing all the disasters. This was probably useful, as firstly, images probably aren't that readily available, and secondly, images would probably have been a tiny bit too graphic.  At the top of each chapter, there was another little illustration. I think that the illustrations were probably some of the best pieces of book artwork that I have ever seen. You might as well just buy the book for it's illustrations, they were that good.

So yeah, if you didn't realise, I liked the book. It's now my favourite non-fiction book...

I am going to give it a 10/10,
And an age rating of 8+








Tuesday, 21 March 2017

American Monsters

American Monsters by Derek Landy

Amber is back, but not she is Astoraths representative. With this in mind, Amber becomes even more determined to find, and kill, her parents. Add this to Milo, Kelly, Glen, the Dark Places convention and more, and things start to get hectic. And it's not like Amber even likes the Shining Demon...

This might just be one of my favourite series ever. Yes, better than Skullduggery Pleasent by the same author (although my brother would disagree😂). I think the reason I like the books so much is because all three of them are full of the same witty banter. The back and forth dialogue between the characters really is just great. At the beginning, Amber, the protagonist, is managing to have a funny conversation, whilst a crazy animal lays its egg on her. And it works! Another thing I like is the fact that the book is a bit like a literary rollercoaster. It goes from one thing to another in the blink of an eye, or the turn of a page. One second they are being chased by a crazy chainsaw wielding maniac, and the next second they are back on the road. And it works because that is the whole point of the book. It's meant to be a bumpy ride. If only one thing happened, the entire thing would be really boring, and that is really what you don't want with a book. Another cool thing that I like about it is the supernatural feel to it. I mean, REAL LIFE DEMONS!!!!!!!!(insert a thousand more exclamation marks)!!!!! And there are so many of these supernatural ocurrances, you begin to believe in them. And can I just say don't read the book at night if you are prone to nightmares. You really won't have nice dreams of candy floss if you read American Monsters. To be honest, that is my only piece of criticism, but you should probably take note of it as IT REALLY IS REALLY VERY SCARY. So, don't say I didn't warn you. Actually, there was one more thing I didn't like, which was the end. I won't spoil it, but you might end up in floods of tears i you are as emotional as I am. But apart from those two points, it was REALLY REALLY VERY GOOD.

I am going to give it a 10/10
And an age rating of 13+